The View From The Cheap Seats by: Neil Gaiman | Review

The View From The Cheap Seats
By: Neil Gaiman
Genre: Non-fiction, Writing, Essays, Short Stories,
Rating: 3.7 rating
Publisher: William Marrow
Re-release Date: May 15, 2017

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Synopsis:

The New York Times bestselling non-fiction collection, now in paperback, from the author of American Gods, now a STARZ Original Series.

An enthralling collection of nonfiction essays on a myriad of topics—from art and artists to dreams, myths, and memories—observed in #1 New York Times bestselling author Neil Gaiman’s probing, amusing, and distinctive style.

An inquisitive observer, thoughtful commentator, and assiduous craftsman, Neil Gaiman has long been celebrated for the sharp intellect and startling imagination that informs his bestselling fiction. Now, The View from the Cheap Seats brings together for the first time ever more than sixty pieces of his outstanding nonfiction. Analytical yet playful, erudite yet accessible, this cornucopia explores a broad range of interests and topics, including (but not limited to): authors past and present; music; storytelling; comics; bookshops; travel; fairy tales; America; inspiration; libraries; ghosts; and the title piece, at turns touching and self-deprecating, which recounts the author’s experiences at the 2010 Academy Awards in Hollywood.

Insightful, incisive, witty, and wise, The View from the Cheap Seats explores the issues and subjects that matter most to Neil Gaiman—offering a glimpse into the head and heart of one of the most acclaimed, beloved, and influential artists of our time.

 

Book Review:

I enjoyed this book because the selections were so vast and progressive. Neil covers topics linked to movies, films, music, books and several other topics that range in a tone of positivity and objectivity, with an imaginative progression, even with the subjects he has less love for than others. I knew going into the book that I would read about pieces of his life and learn more about how he perceives the world, but I can honestly say that what I liked most about reading this book was the way the essays and notations were engaging, light-hearted, funny and engrossing. It was kind of inspiring, at times to read and feel his optimism.

I selected a few articles in this book that I knew I wanted to read and ended up just freely getting caught up in others. For most readers who pick up this book, whether a fan of Gaiman or not, I think this collection will have the same effect. I’d recommend this book for book enthusiast who also likes to get caught up in books that offer layered content without anything complex or overbearing. It’s a good book to have on your shelf to pick up to read at any time and it would make a great road trip book as well.

 

 

About The Author:

Neil Gaiman is the New York Times bestselling author of the novels Neverwhere, Stardust, American Gods, Coraline, Anansi Boys, The Graveyard Book, Good Omens (with Terry Pratchett), The Ocean at the End of the Lane, and The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains; the Sandman series of graphic novels; and the story collections Smoke and MirrorsFragile Things, and Trigger Warning. He is the winner of numerous literary honors, including the Hugo, Bram Stoker, and World Fantasy awards, and the Newbery and Carnegie Medals. Originally from England, he now lives in the United States. He is Professor in the Arts at Bard College.

Find out more about Neil at his website, find all his books at his online bookstore, and follow him on FacebooktumblrTwitterInstagram, and his blog.

 

Tour Organized by:

 

Thanks so much for stopping by for this tour. Be sure to continue to watch this space this week 🙂

Until the next post,

Gia

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We Should All Be Feminists by: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie [Review]

We Should All Be Feminists
By: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Rating: 4.5 stars
Genre: Writing, Non-Fiction, Feminism, Essays, Social Justice
Release Date: July 29, 2014

Synopsis:

An eBook short.

What does “feminism” mean today? That is the question at the heart of We Should All Be Feminists, a personal, eloquently-argued essay—adapted from her much-viewed TEDx talk of the same name—by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the award-winning author of Americanah and Half of a Yellow Sun.

With humor and levity, here Adichie offers readers a unique definition of feminism for the twenty-first century—one rooted in inclusion and awareness. She shines a light not only on blatant discrimination, but also the more insidious, institutional behaviors that marginalize women around the world, in order to help readers of all walks of life better understand the often masked realities of sexual politics. Throughout, she draws extensively on her own experiences—in the U.S., in her native Nigeria, and abroad—offering an artfully nuanced explanation of why the gender divide is harmful for women and men, alike.

Argued in the same observant, witty and clever prose that has made Adichie a bestselling novelist, here is one remarkable author’s exploration of what it means to be a woman today—and an of-the-moment rallying cry for why we should all be feminists

 

Book Review

Though rooted in the backdrop of Nigerian culture, We Should All Be Feminists offers not only a universal reach, but a current perspective when it comes to gender inequality. Like others who have come across this little gem, I found this book insightful, thought provoking and relatable.

Though the hurdles and restrictions I face in America differ from that of Nigeria, it was difficult to read the way in which a mere class monitor position (that she rightfully earned) when she was 9-years-old was passed over to a boy in her class based solely on fact that her classmate was male. Being born with a quick mind and an even quicker tongue, I doubt that without the years of practicing the act of counting to ten (sometimes five) in my head that I would be able to respond or graciously address the systematic gender injustice Adichie describes.

Continue reading

A Writer’s Update–Protect The Writers’ Realm At All Costs

Hello Readers,

Just another Writer Update here, which will be brief. I have a number of tasks to get back to but I wanted to post this up date because it is centered on one of the main things I have been struggling with the last two weeks—my scheduled writing hour blocks. Yes, I do have a valid enough reason for the lag in my schedule (birthday weekend +sister’s graduation + Mother’s Day) but I drive a hard bargain when it comes to my writing schedule and to any novice writer who comes across this post I think it is important that you do as well.

The Importance of Boundaries & Space When You Commit to Writing: The Writers’ Realm

On any given day, friends, family and the rest, will demand your time and attention. As they simultaneously disrespect, disregard and dispute with you over the relativity of you (as a writer,) needing to take or have x amount of time to write in silence and be on your own to formulate your thoughts, or enter that special Writers’ Realm space that we writers enter where our styles and stories materialize. And this space, my friends, is important. This space is vital. This space means the world, the universe and the next galaxy over times two. Sounds a bit over the top? Well, it’s not.

“Why?” You Might Ask. 

Because, these snippets of time help us writers to better our craft, our voices and our developments as creative, mystical creatures and I do mean mystical creatures. I’m always astonished by how much work I get done when I’m in that writers’ zone at the eleventh hour on a personal piece or an assigned piece that took ten (or so) hours of not-so-good-and-often-really-bad writing before I stumble upon an overflowing stream of creative gold. Like the Writers’ Realm, I am sure the same can be said for other like-minded creative individuals who prosper and evolve when they are able to enter their creative spaces, or Fortresses of Solitude when working.

The reason I bring up the importance of the Writers’ Realm is because I had the misfortune of falling into the toxic, near fatal trap of letting the outside world not only steal me away, but keep me away from my own writer’s realm two weeks ago during my birthday weekend. As a result, it set a portion of my scheduled blog posts off by two weeks, and boy has it had a cumbersome affect.

Closing Thoughts:

I love writing; I always have and the fact that I missed my personal deadlines because I permitted others to steal my writing time is disconcerting. I am quiet literally in the middle of the final week for my Masters program, with a list of (awesome) books to review coming up and a spec script to outline and now I have to add post catch up to that list. It may sound like a lot to try to paddle through, but it retrospect it isn’t, or it wasn’t if I did not lose that time.

Developing an active practice to write everyday has been proven to aid writers to write; like a steady flow of water that trickles down from a mountain side you—hmm, I feel a manifesto coming on, which is my cue to wrap up my ramblings. 🙂 My overall point is, do not let any outside forces take you or keep you from your writer’s realm.

A few new creative updates for you though, a new installment for The Protector Series, Declan is now live and can be found on my Medium profile. And although this flash fiction pieces are episodic, be sure to check out the other two installments, Bella and Carmen as well. In the last two weeks, I have started reading three of my ARCs books, the full list is here, and all three have been off to such an exciting start. I cannot wait to share more with you all after I have finished them. Keep your eyes peeled for book reviews down the road ;-), but until next time, as always:

Stay creative,

Gia.